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[GUIDE] I Am Enough by Grace Byers

Updated: Feb 2

PICTURE BOOK LESSON PLAN




GUIDED ANTI-BIAS/ANTI-RACIST READING | GRADES K+

BOOK

I Am Enough by Grace Byers

LESSON PLAN CREATION

Jonathan Ramirez

EDITING TEAM

Bridget Fuller & Kevin Lembke

INTRODUCTION

This lesson is a guided reading experience designed to accompany I Am Enough by Grace Byers. Lesson content, written by Jonathan Ramirez, a student in the UNST 421 Social Justice and Anti-Bias in K12 Education course, was designed to start or deepen anti-bias conversations in families and other learning communities.


SUMMARY & PERSONAL NOTE

I love this story because it introduces aspects of individuality and unity in a unique way. Through similes and metaphors, individuals are shown the range of possibilities one can be no matter the race, color, creed, sexual orientation, etc. The book has a great message of respecting differences and accepting the fact that we are all unique. There is a great sense of belonging that exists in the story, as well as a sense of self worth determined by the individual.


WATCH THE READ ALOUD


OBJECTIVES

This guided reading lesson is designed to be part of a larger life-long commitment to anti-racist teaching and learning for the student and the facilitator. Reading Is Resistance sees reading as an opportunity to seed deeper conversations and opportunities for action around racial equity in our communities. We hold the belief that being anti-racist is a process of learning (and unlearning) over time.


The Teaching Tolerance Social Justice Standards (focused on Identity, Diversity, Justice, and Action) serve as guides for our work.


TEACHING TOLERANCE STANDARDS REFERENCED IN THIS LESSON

The Teaching Tolerance Standards and Domains referenced during discussion question development in this lesson are for Grades K+. This book, however, can be used with a wide range of ages. Here are the domains used to create the discussion questions.

  • Identity Domain, Standard #1: I know and like who I am and can talk about my family and myself and name some of my group identities.

  • Diversity Domain, Standard #6: I know and like who I am and can talk about my family and myself and name some of my group identities.


READ & DISCUSS QUESTIONS

  • Name three things that you like about yourself. Your grown up can help you brainstorm. IDENTITY STANDARD #1, DIVERSITY STANDARD #6

  • The author compares herself to various things and parts of the natural world to describe her strength, beauty, and presence. She says, "Like the sun, I'm here to shine" and "Like time, I'm here to be." Work with your grown up to create your own simile (a poetic comparison statement using the word "like" or the word "as"). What is something from the natural world that you are like? And how are you like that something? RADICAL IMAGINATION

  • The author writes, "We don't look the same. That doesn't dictate our worth." What does that mean to you? Talk about this with your grown up. What does it mean to them? IDENTITY STANDARD #1

  • The author describes herself as the rain with vivid action words. In her read aloud, she talks about this part of her writing. What does it mean for you to pour, drip, and fall like the rain? What can you pour? What do you drip? And what will you let fall like the rain? RADICAL IMAGINATION


READ NEXT

  • I Am Every Good Thing by Derrick Barnes and Gordon C. James

  • I Believe I Can by Grace Byers and Keturah A. Bobo

  • Listening with My Heart by Gabi Garcia and Ying Hui Tan


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