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YOU HOLD ME UP BOOK STUDY
MODULE 5

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WHAT'S NEXT?

It is our hope that this BOOK STUDY, much like YOU HOLD ME UP, will plant some seeds for you. 

 

I have found that picture books have been portals to some of my most profound learning.  This article "How do Teachers Use Picture Books to Draw on the Cultural and Linguistic Diversity in the Classroom" by Marilyn Blakeney-Williams and Nicola Daly talks about the ways that we can use picture books with older students, but I think its argument works for grown ups, too.  They provide a different kind of space for exploring and sharing identity, feeling emotions through words and pictures, and getting inspired creatively.

I've noticed that when I read picture books with the college students I work with, they welcome us to access a different frequency of our learning.  There's a connection back to our younger selves that occurs.  Sometimes, we feel a new sense of belonging, a gratitude for learning the truth, an understanding of responsibility that we didn't experience when we were picture book aged.  We might feel seen or heard in new ways.  We may see a reflection of our joy or our grief.  

Whether you are an educator, a parent, an auntie, a mentor, a counselor, or other adult who impacts young people, 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Here are some of our favorite books to further your learning on the topic of residential/boarding schools.

an indigenous people's history
an indigenous people's history
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marrow thieves
marrow thieves
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sugar falls
sugar falls
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fatty legs
fatty legs
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when we were alone
when we were alone
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when i was eight
when i was eight
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shi shi etko picture
shi shi etko picture
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